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Waste Management opens new landfill gas-to-energy facility

Waste Management opened its new landfill gas-to-energy facility, which will collect landfill gas and convert it into green, renewable energy.

The facility will be able to generate over 6MW of electricity, says Waste Management, enough energy to power 6,000 homes for a year. The project received its Commercial Certificate of Operation from the Ontario Power Authority (OPA) under the Ontario Feed-in Tariff (FIT) program earlier this month and will now provide renewable power to the electrical grid for the City of Ottawa.

“This landfill gas-to-energy facility is a win-win project for the community and Waste Management's landfill,” said Remi Godin, market area gas operations manager for Eastern Canada. “The community benefits from the environmental benefits, and Waste Management will be able to turn a once-wasted commodity into a valuable energy resource.”

Waste Management also a announced partnership with Carleton University to establish a Renewable Energy Laboratory.

The laboratory will be part of Carleton's research, teaching and study of sustainable energy, especially waste-based energy conversion, and be available to undergraduate and graduate students. In addition to the laboratory, Waste Management will establish a Field Energy Centre at the proposed West Carleton Environmental Centre, contingent upon approval from the Ministry of Environment.

Waste Management will provide two $2,000 undergraduate scholarships, awarded annually beginning in 2010 for the next three years.

“We are very pleased to be partnering with Carleton University on this exciting program,” said Ross Wallace, site manager for the West Carleton Environmental Centre. “Combining Waste Management's industry leadership and expertise in waste-based energy conversion with a leading Canadian university will be key for accelerating the growth of waste conversion technologies to help offset the need for non-renewable resources such as coal, natural gas and oil.”

To learn more, visit www.thinkgreen.com.